Dialogue: Only panacea to Zim’s socio-economic predicament

THE suggestion by the Zimbabwe Council of Church (ZCC) to suspend elections in this southern African nation for seven straight years in order to bring relief to the country’s socioeconomic woes is akin to “bashing the mirror” for its revealing one’s ugly face.

Elections are sacrosanct in any State that claims to be a democracy. Plebiscites are held after every determined period, with participants giving benchmarks during the campaign period of what they intend to achieve.

In our judgment here at Zim Morning Post, it is honourable for one to relinquish power if such targets are not met, all things being equal.

Taking away the mandate given to any winning political party following a free and fair electoral process on the basis of a fresh start, as suggested by ZCC is, in our estimation, unprecedented and a gross breach of the Constitution.

In our humble and modest opinion, suspending the will of the electorate and usher in a new order can only happen when a country is under a state of emergency; and Zimbabwe is nowhere near such a scenario.

University of Zimbabwe law lecturer Lovemore Madhuku concurred: “It’s like God has created man and you say you want to reverse that process. It is uncalled for.”

In a positive development, Zimbabwe’s two major political parties – the ruling Zanu PF party and the Nelson Chamisa-led MDC – have shot down ZCC’s submission, describing it as retrogressive and dangerous.

But Zimbabweans, particularly politicians have, in the past, had the propensity to shoot themselves in the foot, sometimes visiting far away America and western Europe to influence their view of Zimbabwe, one way or the other.

In our opinion, MDC vice president Tendai Biti could not have been more succinct in what he said Zimbabwe needed to do, calling for comprehensive dialogue first between Zimbabwe’s two major political parties – Zanu PF and the main opposition MDC party – before the conversation cascades to national level.

We sincerely hope that all political players will reciprocate in a much positive way to calls for dialogue without conditions – if only for the sake of the suffering populace!

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